Monday, April 27, 2009

BALLET INSPIRED

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Just how much does the world of ballet influence bridal? A lot. Traditional ballet costume evolved in the era of the Johann Strass', a young Queen Victoria, and Giselle, an 1840s ballet by Aldophe Adam. Think classic corps de ballet in long white tulle and floral wreath. The 'Willis'--brides to be who had the bad luck to die on the eve of their wedding--wore this exact ensemble in Giselle. Also reflecting the silhouette of the ballet costume as we know it, Queen Victoria clinched the look when she married Prince Albert wearing yards of white lace and dressing her flock of attendants accordingly.

Stephanie James Couture
The most classic ballet-inspired silhouette is a ball gown, sometimes an A-line. Typically a tiny waist sits a top a full gathered skirt.
RS Couture
The ball gown is an hourglass and remains the most dramatic of all bridal The ball gown is an hourglass and remains the most dramatic of all bridal silhouettes. It is as romantic a confection as those seen in the corps de ballet, flowing in swirls of white tulle. The skirt and its under structure are both based on volume. Thus, sweeping skirts equal sweeping entrances especially awesome on brides who know how to work their strut.
Regardless of its formality, a ball gown seems to have flex when it comes to showing up anywhere and looking beautiful. While they go great in all the splendor of a full-blown cathedral ceremony, imagine an outdoor garden wedding where nature, big and diverse as a thousand cathedrals can be the perfect sanctuary.
Tall, slim brides carry this silhouette off best. Also if you’re medium to tall and pear shaped, you’ll benefit from the uber-volume in the skirts that camouflage your every imperfection from the waist down. Petite brides who want some gown drama might be better off going with the more modified A-line since the mass of a ball gown skirt will swallow you up.

Variations of the Ball Gown

Bouffant or Hourglass
-Fitted bodice with cinched natural or dropped waist atop gathered or pleated full skirt.
Bubble-Bouffant shaped skirt swelling out of a cinched natural or dropped waist. Skirt curves in a balloon like shape at the hemline.
Petal-Very structured over skirt. Imagine a fuchsia. A cinched natural or dropped waist sitting atop a full skirt with curving under structure that slits open in the front. Sometimes shows a bit.

RS Couture

An A-line cut is a more modified form of hourglass, bringing with it refinement and understatement. Fitted through the bodice, the A-line can have a slight to moderate flair in the skirt. Dubbed by fashionistas as “The Deb Dress” it’s been one of the most popular silhouettes for the reason it flatters just about every figure type.

La Sposa
Head chic that instantly comes to mind for ballet-inspired bridal is either the floral wreath or modified cloche cap of white feathers emulating The Swan Queen in Swan Lake. A tiara or single floral(s) attached to a bun is also considered a classic ballet touch.

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La Sposa

Olga D’Gallegos

3 comments:

Cassiopeia said...

beautiful... i love ballet costumes. i collect ballet photography books so adore this inspiration :-D

thanks for the lovely comment!

xxxc

Natalie said...

Oh, I love this post of yours! Ballet is such fun! Now I cannot wait for that tulle to arrive, so that I can have my very own Amy-Jo tulle ballet skirt. :)

Monique said...

This is so great. Makes sense how all those big white skirts came to be.