Thursday, April 30, 2009


Reinaldo Alverez
No matter how simple or paired down a gown can get, some women just can’t get into wearing a dress even on their wedding day. For this reason, pantsuits are becoming a stylish alternative. Pant legs can vary from slim cigarette widths to wide culotte cuts.

Jacket styles are key to characterizing your suit. Do you want the more open and romantic look of a 3/4 length coat or do you feel more comfortable in a man-tailored jacket? Below are some of your options.

Tailored Jacket-The classic. Either single or double-breasted, the tailored jacket ends just below the derriere and can have a notched or shawl lapel or no lapel at all.

Dressmaker Jacket-Shorter than the tailored jacket, this cut ends at the hip line and can be single or double-breasted. Like the tailored jacket, it has the same collar treatments. Tailoring usually has softer lines.
Nehru, Mandarin or Cossack Jacket—All are ethnic inspired. All have high turtleneck style collar. Typically tunic-length, each has its own ethnicity distinguished by trim or the fabric used to create it. For instance, Mandarin jackets are usually made out of brocade. The Cossack is made out of any type wool and has a row of trim around the collar, extending down the side front of the jacket.
Three-Quarter Length Jacket-Longer than the tailored jacket, this cut is usually worn over a straight or A-line style skirt. We're seeing more lately though paired with pants.
Eisenhower-Popularized by the General during WWII, this jacket crops at the waist and is typically double breasted. Eisenhower jackets had a revival period during the mid-70s and have continued to be a fashionable alternative. Usually wore with high waisted stove-pipe pants.
Bolero-A shorter jacket that crops above the waistline. Has curved front corners and no buttons

Christina Creations

Christina Creations


Accessorizing your pantsuit with a bridal touch is one of the ways you can customize it for a wedding. Everyday buttons on a jacket for instance can be replaced with fabric covered or jeweled ones. Your jacket can also have couture techniques such as hand-bound buttonholes. Shorter veils like cages or poufs of netting go great with pantsuits. If you’re not the veil type, consider a hat or headpiece that compliments. Hats and suits go together, especially a hat with some kind of veiling over the eyes. It takes the place of a blusher and offers a certain sophistication to being veiled rather than that symbolic ‘being given away’ business.


Fashion Moment said...

1st is gorgeous!


Gretchen Pallis said...

Love your new cover photo.

nina said...

I was just thinking about this...I never see any brides with pants on...and they too can be fabulous, as seen in that first photo :-)