Tuesday, April 19, 2011

SALUTE TO MADELINE VIONET

Pioneer of the bias cut, Madeleine Vionet, once said, '"When a woman smiles, her dress must also smile" . Translated I think madamoiselle may have meant, a woman is happiest wearing her gown like a second skin. Long before the development of knits, the bias cut was used for body-hugging silhouettes like the Vionet original above. It all started back in the 1920s when the Parisian couturier developed a technique utilizing the true cross grain of fabric rather than straight grain lines of weft or warp of the fabric. Vionnet used fabrics like crêpe and charmeuse; These were novel to women's wear in the 1920s and 30s. She also ordered fabrics two yards wider than the 19-36"norm for the time so that she could work out draping and layout techniques. As a result gowns and dresses moved beautifully when cut on the bias. Vionnet's trademark: styles that cling to and move with the wearer. Examples: Bias cut gowns with cowl necklines, the handkerchief dress of the 1920s, and halter top. By 1930, Hollywood designers took advantage of Vionet's bias cut and made it into a real trend via moving pictures. Today the bias cut gown is a classic option for brides.
source
Madeleine Vionet in her studio circa 1920
With tulle overlay by Blumarine
Greco-Roman in inspiration, by Rosa Clara.


From Elie Saab

V-shaped neckline by Manuel Mota for Pronovias.

3 comments:

Jenn said...

Madeline Vionet was certainly a very beautiful woman.


Jenn
Weddings

Lissa (The Wedding Bistro at Bellenza) said...

Fabulous bias cut gowns you've found!

grace @ wedding favors said...

Bias cut gowns always have this sexy impression. :D Thanks to Madeline Vionet for pioneering it! :D